Natural Science and Philosophy

This last year (2017-18) we’ve been exploring the classical liberal arts tradition together as a school. Our mission is to inspire students with an education founded on a Christian worldview, informed by the classical tradition and approached with diligence and joy, and that second part “informed by the classical tradition” is central to so much […]

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Classical Education and STEM: a Common Misconception

I’d like to address head on a common misconception about classical education. And this is a misconception that classical schools all over the nation have to address, and it’s the type of thing that sort of hovers on the background of conversations. And that is the idea that classical education is really great at the […]

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The Liberal Art of Rhetoric (PT. 4)

Why do we need the art of rhetoric today? The fear of public speaking is known as glossophobia. And pretty much everywhere I look, the statistic given is that 74% of people today suffer from some form of speech anxiety. 74%, virtually 3 in 4 modern people! It is the highest ranked phobia, followed by […]

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The Liberal Art of Dialectic (PT. 3)

In this blog article series we are exploring the trivium, the three arts of language, what Dorothy Sayers called the lost tools of learning. These arts are not subjects, that is, topics of study unto themselves, like American Government or Biology. Rather, the classical liberal arts are more like intellectual skills or virtues that, when mastered, enable students […]

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The Liberal Art of Grammar (pt. 2)

By the parking lot at Clapham School grows a morning glory. Each morning this fall I was welcomed to school by its indigo colored flowers. Each morning they opened toward the sun as if trumpeting praises to God. Then one day I substituted in Class Five and was asked to read this passage about the morning glory: “The [morning glory] had caught [a plant] in its hundred embraces and […]

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The Liberal Arts of the Trivium (pt. 1)

The liberal arts have fallen on hard times. Of course, I don’t mean that bachelor’s degrees from liberal arts colleges are in decline. The presidents of liberal arts colleges across the nation can wax eloquent about the importance of the “liberal arts,” by which they mean general studies, rather than a purely technical job-focused degree. […]

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The Inspiration of the Muses

By Jason Barney, Academic Dean From time immemorial artists and musicians, poets and playwrights have claimed that their artistic productions came not from themselves or their genius, but from some power or divinity outside and beyond them. They were inspired and became the conduit for something beautiful to come into the world. But inspiration has fallen […]

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The Training of the Gymnasium

By Jason Barney, Academic Dean “What has the gymnasium to do with classical education?” we might ask ourselves. Academics have to do with the mind, we suppose, while PE and sports focus only on the body. Some classical education enthusiasts might even be inclined to disparage our society’s admittedly crazed emphasis on sports. And they would […]

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The “Way of the Will” and the Body of Christ

By Ashlyn Duff, Explorers II Teacher In 1 Corinthians 12 the apostle Paul uses a unique metaphor to explain how the Church is supposed to function. Take a look: For the body does not consist of one member but of many.  If the foot should say, “Because I am not a hand, I do not belong […]

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Educating for Piety

by Jason Barney, Academic Dean I see no way to sum up the offense of modern man except to say that he is impious…. He has taken up arms against, and he has effectually slain, what former men have regarded with filial veneration. He has not been conscious of crime but has… regarded his action […]

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